Davidstow Church at Camelford Show by Bill Pearce

For many years I have been a chronic insomniac – trouble sleeping at night. In our house the light and the telly are on all night; I spend most of the long hours in my study on my computer – browsing, reading the newspapers or playing Scrabble. Most nights I do sleep for a couple of hours or so on my recliner chair. The night before the Show, when I needed some sleep, it was particularly bad however – I remember seeing 5.00 am and then did drop off only for my alarm to go at 6.30 am. The last thing I wanted to do was to spend a day at the Show, but my mate was on his way to collect me so I had no choice When we arrived at the Showground the wind was blowing, rain seemed imminent, and there weren’t too many visitors around. Mid morning a huge black cloud did lash the Showground for several minutes, but then it cleared up, and we had visitors in number.

This year’s Show Presidents were two sisters, Camelford to the core, Madge and Sally Walkey (Moore). Congratulations to the Show Committee who could not have chosen two more worthy patrons. They toured the ground in a Land Rover Discovery driven by Preston Baker, accompanied by wife Fran. Honoured we were when the vehicle stopped outside our gazebo and I was able to exchange niceties with the two dear ladies and reminisce briefly with Sally who was a 5A class mate at Sir James’ way back in 1950. Keeping it in the family, soon after brother Johnny and his wife stopped by. Me being me I asked her her name and was momentarily confused when she replied Sally Walkey. She was of course the daughter of Bert Collins, the Butcher.

I have to admit my grey matter is in gradual decline and it bothers me when people stop for a chat and though I recognise the face I can’t recall the name. I have to excuse myself and usually make some bland statement about being old but still the right side of the grass’. Throughout the day I reckon a dozen or so stopped to reminisce on my time at Plymouth Argyle or with Cornwall Air Ambulance. It is always a dangerous occupation selecting individuals so I won’t fall into that trap. Having said that I will tell you of one visit which really pleased me. Brothers John and Percy Treleaven came and shook hands. We were at St Teath School back in the 1940’s.

We were busy walking memory lane when sister Marina arrived on the scene and gave me a heart warming hug. Couldn’t resist having a photograph taken with them. And a brief mention for Julian Harman, Branch Chairman Camelford Royal British Legion, and his colleagues who joined me for a photo call but for reasons known only to the camera the damned thing didn’t print.

Readers may be forgiven if they conclude this was a day release for Billy and his carer. There was of course a far more important reason for us being there as we have not one, but two Concerts in the next four months. On 13 October we welcome back the Callington Community Gospel Choir to be followed in December by the greatly anticipated Military Wives Choir and our main ambition was to promote these events. Along the way we sold a few Cornish Passports to help defray the costs of being there. Did we succeed? Unquestionably. How successful only time will tell. We sold tickets for the Military Wives Concert. With four months to go I personally had sold over 40. With less than 200 seats available this event is clearly on course to being an early “Sell Out”. On the day we distributed over 500 flyers and await a response to those. Admission to the Gospel Choir event is free.

Appreciation of fellow Churchwarden Ann Hayne, PCC Treasurer Reg Statton and Verger Edwin Dickinson who popped in to render their support.

A mention in dispatches for Robert. A major frustration of being 80+ is the loss of ability to do manual things and being reliant on others. Have worked with Robert, who lives in Plymouth, since 1988. He is always on call to help and single handed managed our event display. And a thank you to the missus for her support on the day.

Robert - an invaluable help
Robert – an invaluable help

At 6.30 am the day was a chore, twelve hours later I wouldn’t have missed it for the world. A generous plate of pork in a fruity BBQ sauce with rice at The Wilsey on the way home crowned a day to remember!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.