The 2022 Drought in Cornwall

For the previous article in this series please see:

The August Heatwave(s) in Cornwall

There ultimately proved to be two official heatwaves in August, but Autumn now seems to have arrived in North Cornwall. It is currently raining, but it remains to be seen how quickly the decline in Cornish reservoir levels can be reversed.

Earlier today the South West Lakes Trust updated their table of the current water levels of Cornish reservoirs:

South West Water also provide graphs for the largest two:

The water level at Colliford reduced by 3.1% of its total net capacity last week. Stithians fell by 3.2%. Our local Crowdy Reservoir declined by 2% over the week and Upper Tamar reservoir is down to 24% of its total net capacity.

[Edit – September 7th]

The recent rain in Cornwall doesn’t seem to have slowed down the decline of the water levels in our reservoirs much. South West Water have released last week’s water level data for Colliford and Stithians reservoirs, which look like this:

The water level at Colliford reduced by 2.4% of its total net capacity last week. Stithians fell by 3.0%, and is now down to 24.2% of its total net capacity.

[Edit – September 9th]

The South West Lakes Trust have now updated their table of the current water levels of Cornish reservoirs:

Thanks to the recent rains the water level at Crowdy Reservoir has stabilised at 40%. However Upper Tamar is down another 3%.

[Edit – September 15th]

Here’s the last four weeks record from the automated rainfall gauge 49104 at Colliford Lake:

Some of that rain is now making its way into Cornish reservoirs. For some reason South West Water haven’t updated their graphs yet. However the latest South West Lakes Trust table of the water levels in Cornish reservoirs reveals this :

Crowdy has increased by 1%, which is welcome news in the Davidstow area! Stithians has stabilised at 24%. However Colliford and Upper Tamar are both down another 1%.

[Edit – September 21st]

After missing last week’s update South West Water have released two weeks worth of water level data for Colliford and Stithians reservoirs, which now look like this:

With the advent of the current “Indian Summer” here in Cornwall the decline in reservoir levels has unfortunately resumed.

[Edit – September 24th]

The South West Lakes Trust have now updated their table of the current water levels of Cornish reservoirs:

Among the smaller reservoirs Crowdy is holding steady, but Upper Tamar is down another 2% to 18% of net capacity.

[Edit – September 29th]

South West Water have released last week’s water level data for Colliford and Stithians reservoirs:

It has been raining here in North Cornwall recently, but the reservoir levels are still dropping quickly:

The South West Lakes Trust have also updated their table of the current water levels of Cornish reservoirs:

Upper Tamar is looking particularly unhealthy, with a mere 16% of total net storage still available.

Watch this space!

One Reply to “The 2022 Drought in Cornwall”

  1. The forecast thunderstorms have reached Davidstow:

    Whether the welcome rain helps fill up Cornwall’s reservoirs remains to be seen, but it has already caused an unwelcome, but sadly not unexpected, side effect:

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    Several beaches in North Cornwall and further afield have already been subject to sewage pollution:

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